Your Apps Know Where You Were Last Night, and They’re Not Keeping It Secret | The New York Times →

Brian Wong, chief executive of Kiip, a mobile ad firm that has also sold anonymous data from some of the apps it works with, says users give apps permission to use and share their data. “You are receiving these services for free because advertisers are helping monetize and pay for it,” he said, adding, “You would have to be pretty oblivious if you are not aware that this is going on.”

This is the most worrying part for me. The attitude, in fact down right arrogance, that people should be aware of where their data goes when they are not explicitly told. “Expect adverts unless you are told otherwise” is the excuse of the worst type of profiteering, it makes me sick to my stomach to see the attitudes of some tech companies.


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Top 10 iPad features we’d like to see in iOS 13 | Macworld →

Time for an overhaul, so that—at minimum—two apps can access the audio input at one time. That would let me talk to someone on Skype while recording the conversation with a different app.

This would be huge for me, recording podcasts is the single thing that keeps a MacBook hanging around. I would still edit with keyboard and mouse but it’s 100% time for better audio on an iPad.


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Here are the five biggest iPad Pro problems, because no device is perfect →

The iPad Pro packs in an astounding amount of processing power, doubling the benchmark scores of the 10.5-inch iPad Pro in multiple tests, and even exporting a 4K HEVC video in less than half the time. Here’s the issue: that power is going to waste.

I agree with some of the points in this post, but I don’t really see a downside here. Many apps don’t take advantage of the power, they simply don’t need to. But is this really a ‘problem’?


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The Big iPad | Matt Gemmell →

Also, be extremely skeptical of anyone who makes a judgement about switching to an iPad when they haven’t actually done it themselves (this goes for most judgements about most things throughout life). This group includes the apparent majority of tech journalists, most of whom seem to have an annual ritual of spending one week with the newest iPad, and then saying it’s not a laptop replacement yet in some general sense. How would you even know? I certainly didn’t until six months or so in.

This is dead on correct. I have fallen out of faith with many reviews on tech sites. This doesn’t just refer to iPad reviews, but it has increased the frustration. How can you review something like the iPad without actually using it for a serious amount of time. Posting a review of a different phone each week is one thing, but not actually using a whole other system and drawing a judgement is the wrong take.

I appreciate that the iPad is polarising bit of tech, and I am more than slightly bias. It’s not a computer for everyone - but it might be for you if you actually TRY!


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The 2018 iPad Pro | The Dent →

The iPad Pro’s are not cheap, by any stretch of the imagination. They are also, potentially, almost too powerful for what you can do with them right now. These two points, however, go hand in hand. The hardware is only half of the equation. Yes, they are quite expensive for a tablet, but they are also priced quite well when you consider it as a laptop.

Now People that actually use an iPad will begin to tell you what the difference these upgrades make to their usage. Andy’s thoughts mirror most of my own and almost make me want to write a post.

The hardware is only part of the equation - and when looked at individually the upgrades aren’t huge. However I have found that the whole package together makes a huge difference to me that it’s hard to put my finger on one thing.


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The iPad Pro Review | TechCrunch →

Microsoft still hasn’t been able (come at me) to ever get it through their heads that they needed to start by cutting the head off of their OS and building tablet first, then walking backwards. I think now Microsoft is probably much more capable than then Microsoft, but that’s probably another whole discussion.

Apple went and cut the head off of OS X at the very beginning, and has been very slowly walking in the other direction ever since. But the fact remains that no Surface Pro has ever offered a tablet experience anywhere near as satisfying as an iPad’s.

Yes, it may offer more flexibility, but it comes at the cost of unity and reliably functionality. Just refrigerator toasters all the way down.

This is by far the best sim up of my stance for the iPad. I know I am a little bias towards using the device full time - but Apple have taken the correct approach in my opinion. They get a lot of stick for the OS not being able to do ‘normal’ computer tasks.

Yet I would much rather have a touch OS that makes steady improvements of its ability than a desktop OS made to accept touch input. Things will improve again come WWDC and the narrative will change again.


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Dan Frakes Goes to Apple as Mac App Store Editor | Daring Fireball →

The talent pool writing about Apple products and platforms from outside the company’s walls is getting noticeably shallower.

I don’t agree with this statement at all. And it’s typical that someone like John would make it. There is a huge talent pool of people writing about Apple for the enjoyment and a huge community of bloggers and video makers.

The issue is all of the ‘old guard’ and still clinging onto each other and not open to others. You only have to point to the iPhone X reviews fiasco and all the toys that were thrown out of the Pram to see the attitudes we are dealing with.


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How I'm Freeing Myself from the Trap of Stuff I Don't Need | Tiny Buddha →

Will it give my life meaning? Make my life easier, better? Why do I really want it? Is it only because I am chasing a feeling? Or because I want to squelch one? What would happen if I didn’t buy it?

The number one word you will hear me repeat when talking about my technology now is value. It’s a question that I ask myself almost constantly about apps, services and hardware.

Will it add value to my life? Will I gain something from the purchase outside of a happy feeling that wear off after a few moments. The answer more often than not is no.


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Scientists Say They've Found The Driver of False Beliefs, And It's Not a Lack of Intelligence →

“If you think you know a lot about something, even though you don’t, you’re less likely to be curious enough to explore the topic further, and will fail to learn how little you know,” says one of the team members behind the new study, Louis Marti from the University of California, Berkeley.

Oh. So there is no direct link between intelligence and not fact checking yourself? I understand the point attempting to be made here, people are more likely to live in an echo chamber. However surely people know how to fact check themselves and listen to over whelming push back?

There is a difference between thinking differently from evidence like Graham Hancock and thinking the world is flat.


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